Palm tree

Some more from the beautiful scenery I enjoyed until earlier this week – a palm tree on the beach…


The grid:



And the drawing:



Change of scenery (Iguana)

Recently, I enjoyed a massive change of scenery – from the City of London to the beautiful Dominical in tropical Costa Rica’s Pacific coast. It is a bit sad to be back. But nevermind – this is what I played with while I was there (obviously, using Sketch Grid)

The grid:


The drawing:


How to use Sketch Grid

We were playing around with photos of the City a few evenings ago, and I thought I’d take some pictures of our sketching and try to demonstrate how to use Sketch grid to draw and explore images.

As we have always maintained, Sketch Grid is not a copy application – it more a contemplative tool that allows you to play with different compositions and then easily sketch and explore the relationships between the lines in the image. In the future I would like to make a simlar tool for more colour-oriented artists – one that will flatten colours and allow you to fill areas as opposed to delineate them, but now I’m onto lines, so this is a very line-oriented example.

Here is the original composition, with a four-by-four grid superimposed, and my best approximation of the same grid in my sketch book. By the way, do you think the app should tell you the exact ratio of the rectangle?


And here is what we made of it – you can see that even with the grid on, the bottom one exaggerates the size of what is of interest – in this case St Paul’s cathedral’s dome. This is the reason to use a grid in the first place – to dampen our propensity to emphasise the interesting and downplay the mundane. This is apparently why all doodlers overstate the size of the eyes in a face.


But anyway – play with it and see what you get…